Dream Project curriculum

See Dream Project website for more details
Thanks to Kelly Sullivan Walden for this Curriculum.

A 6-12th grade curriculum created to inspire the youth of the world to engage in the U.N. Millennium Development Goals. By 2015,
1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
2. Achieve universal primary education
3. Promote gender equality and empower women
4. Reduce child mortality
5. Improve maternal health
6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
7. Ensure environmental sustainability
8. Develop a global partnership for development
“The world needs DREAMers. The world needs DOers. The world Needs DREAMers that DO and DOers that DREAM!”
(quote inspired by Allen Marino and the 2008 8th Grade Class of Celerity-Nascent Charter School)

Table of Contents
UN Millennium Development Goals 2
Mission Statement 4
Dream Project Outline for Teachers 5
Course Outline Overview 6
Reports 6
Resources 6
Supplemental Movies 7
Seating Arrangements 7
Guidelines 7
Blogging 7
Rundown of Each Class 8
Class One 12
Class Two 14
Class Three 16
Class Four 17
Class Five 17
Class Six 19
Class Seven 20
Class Eight 21
Class Nine 22
Class Ten 24
Class Eleven 25
Class Twelve 27
Contract 28
Favorite Dream Project Quotes 29

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead
“We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”
— Albert Einstein
Dream Project Mission Statement

The Dream Project, in relationship with Enlightened Innertainment (EI), creates and facilitate programs that inspire solution consciousness and empowers young people to create global solutions.
We teach reverse problem solving (“reverse solution magnetizing”) and plant seeds of inspiration, creativity and imagination by facilitating access to the “dreaming” part of the mind. We applaud new ideas (as bizarre as they may sometimes seem.) We honor the risk it takes to share something new. We encourage courage. It is time for change, and as Gandhi said, we “Seek to be the change we wish to see in the world.”

In the Dream Project students are empowered to see themselves and relate to one another as leaders that embody global responsibility, compassion, and desire to use their talents in service to a world that works for everyone. We are currently focusing on solutions for the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), but the Dream Project is a model to access solutions inherent in any problem… personal, communal, societal, or global.

Our goal is to distribute our curriculum and training program to educators and youth leaders throughout the world. We endeavor to provide teachers with tools to empower students to become the visionaries and actionaries of a world that fulfills the promise of the MDGs.

This program includes the following materials:
• Manual for Teachers
• Workbook for Students
• Interactive Website
• Visioning CD“Dream 2015”
• DVD (trailer/presentation)

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Dream Project Outline for Teachers
Empower your students to become passionate and inspired in the classroom through the dream project leadership program (Grades 6-12). What strategies and activities can we use to capture and hold our students’ interest, strengthen their leadership skills, increase productivity, reinforce initiative, enthusiasm, and encourage them to be active learners? The Dream Project is filled with practical, classroom-proven strategies that can be used immediately with your Social Studies, English, Public Speaking, and History classes. This program is designed to engage and motivate students while
increasing their leadership skills and sense of global/community responsibility. Here’s what you’ll find…
• A new template for capturing the attention, passion, and enthusiasm of your students.
• New and innovative strategies for discovering relevance to history, government, and public speaking.
• Activities you can use tomorrow that don’t require extensive preparation.
• Strategies to engage students in becoming responsible role models in their communities, and passionate leaders in their world.
• How to structure classes in order to maximize student learning and keep students engaged.
• Kinesthetic activities that get students up and moving around the classroom while actively learning.

Kelly Sullivan Walden is the creator of the Dream Project. She is a United Nations NGO delegate, the President of the Women’s National Book Association (Los Angeles Chapter) and the author of I had the Strangest Dream. Her specialty is in empowering people to live the life of their dreams. The Dream Project Curriculum is an educational tool that contains innovative strategies and activities to kindle the dream of a better world while affirming every student’s power to help achieve that dream.

“The effect that the Dream Project is having on the students is actually my dream for what I’d like to see happen in every classroom. This project gives the class work relevance to the students, while it inspires leadership and activism.” Mary Mills (Vice Principal, Nimitz Middle School)

“I feel important for the first time in my life…like I can actually do something that will make a difference in the world. I never saw myself like that before.” Karla Cisneros (6th grader, Nimitz Middle School)

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Thank you for participating in the Dream Project, a project that will challenge
your student’s creativity, imagination, and ability to access the “solution” aspect of
their minds. In this project, your students are leaders and visionaries that have the
potential to make a positive and real contribution to the world.
Two class periods a week for twelve weeks will be dedicated to the Dream Project.
One of those days of the week the students will participate in a leadership course,
and on the other day of the week the students will research information about
their assigned goal (one of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.)
Every four weeks the students will have an opportunity to express what they have
been learning through their research in the form of a collaborated report that the
students will present with their group in front of the classroom. Their reports can be
written, they can use poster boards, write a song, give a speech, or some other form
of creative expression that represents what the students have learned about their goal.
The following are suggested questions for the students to research and present for their reports:

Report # 1: Date of presentation: ___
The past - Describe the history of their goal:
• What are the issues?
• Who does the problem affect?
• When did the problem start?
• What area on the globe does this issue primarily exist?
• What are their personal thoughts and feelings about this issue?

Part 2: Date of presentation: ____
The present What is being done about their goal now?
• Who are the organizations that are currently working toward the fulfillment of their goal?
• Who is doing the best job?
• Where is this work being focused?
• When did this group start their work?
• What are their personal thoughts and feelings about the work they are doing?

Part 3: Date of presentation: ____
The future - What does the future hold? This section is the most important part of the entire project, where the students will work together with their group and write /present a report based, from the future, about how their goal was accomplished. The students will need to identify:
• What do the students imagine happened that accomplished their goal?
• What was the “tipping point”?
• Who did it affect?
• Where did their solution have the greatest impact?
• What role did the students play in the successful accomplishment?

Part Two of The Dream Project (see The Dream Project, Part 2 curriculum—not included in these materials) can be presented once a week for a twelve-week period, directly following Part One. This program will provide students with exposure to media, marketing, songwriting, connecting with local activists, politicians, etc… The students will create realizable media campaigns and garner media attention by becoming role models that embody the Dream Project principles.

Resources:
• Our Link page: http://www.dreamprojectun.org/links.html
• Student’s millennium goals website: http://www.cyberschoolbus.un.org/mdgs/flash/index.asp
• Immigration issues: http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/student/2006/about.asp
• Why MDGs Matter: http://www.iht.com//articles/2005/09/13/opinion/eddervis.php
• Teen Wisdom: http://www.teenwisdom.com/
• Partnerships for Change (PFC): http://www.PartnershipsForChange.com

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Supplemental Movies:
• Building A Dream, Oprah Winfrey’s School in South Africa:
http://www.oprah.com/presents/2007/academy/dream/dream_main.jhtml
• “An Inconvenient Truth” http://www.climatecrisis.net/
• “Baraka Boys” http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2006/boysofbaraka/
Seating arrangements:
Since a large portion of this project will include small group interaction, the students should be divided into eight groups and should sit either at a table with their respective groups or their desks should form a circle. Each group will assign each member a specific role (i.e. “group leader, secretary, report chairman, spokesperson, etc…)

Guidelines:
1. Because this is called “The Dream Project,” the use of imagination and the “dreaming” part of the mind is highly encouraged. Teachers should applaud new ideas (as bizarre as they may sometimes seem.) Keep in mind that you are fostering “solution consciousness” and in order for this to take place
they need positive reinforcement when they are accessing this part of their mind,
whether or not the actual “solution” they speak of appears to be “realistic.”
2. While the teacher is speaking, if a student suddenly gets a light bulb over head, an idea or solution that relates to the project, they can say “Light bulb alert” and express their idea. There should always be applause to honor the risk it takes to share something new, as well as to encourage courage and “solution” conversations inside and outside the classroom.
3. Encourage the students to make an art project of decorating the classroom with their
“Light bulb” moments, with inspirational slogans, and the MDGs.
4. The context here is that WE NEED THEM…the student’s ideas, innocence, and belief that ANYTHING is possible. The teacher during this project is to act more as a “space holder” for the students to discover their own solutions. You provide the outline, and they fill in the space with their imagination, ideas, and insights.
5. Community Service and Global Outreach—Once the students become aware of their power to affect change and their responsibility to do so, they are primed and ready to plug their energy and passion into a community service project of their choice as well as a project that connects them philanthropically with the larger world. The Dream Project facilitator will begin to offer suggestions as to the appropriate outlet for the students goodwill. This can take the shape of an art project, a performance of songs written by students where the proceeds go toward supporting an orphanage or starting a garden, etc…

Blogging:
Blogging will be an essential part of this project to give the students a 24/7 outlet to express themselves, share their ideas, resources, and inspiration. For more information about setting up blogging for your class, see www.dreamprojectUN.org

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Synopsis of Each Class: (For a more detailed description of each class, see the following chapters
categorized by the number of the class.)

Class One Overview: Introduction
• Discuss the UN and what it represents.
• Discuss the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs - p.1).
• Sign contracts (see page 28), have the students read it, sign and date it.
• Each group leader will pull a goal out of a hat and present it to their group.
• The introduction of the trajectory of this project as an overview.
• SLANT
• Time Travel—the teacher “sends the students into the future.
• The students should then share about what they saw and connected with in this exercise.
• Homework: Write a paragraph on what they saw, felt, or what thoughts were inspired from the
“time travel exercise.”

Class Two: Hero’s Journey
• Discuss: The purpose of seeing the full circle of the Hero’s Journey.
• Activity: Assign Hero’s Journey Stations around the classroom, with one student representing each stage. Have the students walk through each station, clockwise.
• Assignment: Write an essay about how you imagine your hero’s journey will be during this project.

Class Three Overview: Affirmations
• Give them an opportunity to practice while you read quote by Kofi A. Annan.
• Introduce Affirmations and purpose.
• Go through MDG Affirmations.
• Activity: Create posters for the classroom that expresses the Affirmation version of each group’s goal.
• Homework: Write about your feelings about the affirmation version of your goal.
• Do you see the importance of the affirmative version of your goal?
• How does it make you feel?
• What does it make you think about?

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Class Four Overview: First Report-The Past
What was it like?
In this report the students will address the following:
1. What is the history of the issue is that their goal addresses?
2. Whom does the problem most directly affect?
3. When did the problem start?
4. Why did the problem start?
5. Where the problem primarily exists?
6. What are your personal thoughts and feelings about this issue?

Class Five Overview: They Is Me!
• Read Shamina Degonzaga quote.
• Read “Hero” quote
• Discuss: “They is Me!”
• Read: The Life of Our Dreams (Daily Om)
• Activity: Human Knot.
• Visualization of Goal already realized:
• “What is that I must become in order to be a magnet for this goal to be fulfilled?
• What must I do?
• What must I release?
• What qualities must I embrace (i.e. love, peace, harmony, kindness, courage, etc…)?”
• Homework: Answer the questions listed above with regards to your MDG as well as your personal goal.

Class Six Overview: Leadership Training
• Read quote by Edwin H Friedman.
• Discuss examples of leaders.
• Class Participation in “Who is your favorite Leader?” conversation.
• Discussion about “Qualities of a Leader”
• Assignment: List the five leaders you most admire—identify your #1 leadership quality.
• Activity: Create nametag from quality, act as if you fully embodied this quality, and introduce yourself to 10 people as your new “name.”
• Homework: Write a paper discussing what your life would be like if you fully embodied your leadership quality?
• What would be different?
• What might change?
• How would your goal be affected if you fully embodied your leadership quality?

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Class Seven Overview: Be-Do-Have
• Reading: by Marianne Williamson
• Be-Do-Have
• Discussion: Most people relate to goals as DoHaveBe
• Think Globally, Act Locally: This section is about the students looking at
the global issues, but bringing it home, relating to it with regards to issues they are
dealing with in their life.
• Discussion: If you could make a difference in your community, in your school, in
your neighborhood, or in your family, what would you do?
• Activity: Each group makes a list of the ideas their group comes up with to fulfill their goal for a
community service project.
• Homework: Write a paper: Identify a possible action plan for the fulfillment of your goal.

Class Eight Overview: Second Report-The Present
The entire class period will be devoted to the presentation of each group’s report on the present aspect of their
goalWhat is being done now? The students will address the following questions:
1. Who are the organizations and individuals that are that are currently working toward the fulfillment of your goal?
They should pick one that they think is doing the best job.
2. What is the group that they think is the most effective doing toward the solution?
3. Where are they doing their work?
4. When did this group start their work?
5.What are their personal thoughts and feelings about this group and the work they are doing?
Q&A with the class: The group presenting will act as experts in the field of their goal while enlightening the rest
of the class about the current individuals and organizations that are making positive impact on the issue on which
they are working.

Class Nine Overview: The Invitation & Bringing It Down to Earth
• Read “The Invitation” to the class.
• Activity: Ask the students to underline each part of the poem they agree with, circle anything they disagree with
or don’t understand.
• Discussion:
• Have the students share about the part of the poem that spoke most profoundly to them and why.
• What will you do when this project is complete?
• Community Service Project: Group discussion regarding a project that they would like to do bring the MDGs to
their community.
• Homework: Continue planning and putting into action the beginning stages of their service project.

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Class Ten Overview: The Law of Importance
(complements of Woody Woodward)
• Read Quote Mary Kay Ash.
• Class Assignment: Identify the “I”-s.
• Participation: Allow all the students to share their “1”-s
(either in their small groups or at class level.)
• Discussion: Anatomy of an “I”
• Why is this an important thing for an effective leader to know?
• Class Participation: Ask for a student to share about a fight or a battle of wills they
have recently had and how this related to their “I”. Identify that with an understanding of the Law of Importance
they could have negotiated their way through this confrontation more effectively. Remember that a person will
do anything within their belief system to defend or support their “I”-s.
• Activity: Pair up with someone you don’t know very well. They will be your partner for this “Trust Exercise.”
• Continue conversation about progress re: Community Service Project
• Homework
• Write about a person you have or have had a conflict with and how this can be changed with a
deeper understanding of the law of Importance.
• Write about your most important “I”, and why it means so much to you.
• How can you meet that “I” regardless of your circumstances?

Class Eleven Overview: On What Level Do You Want To Make A Difference?
• Read: “Starfish” (Author Unknown) and “Purpose” by Cynthia Cursey
• Discuss Life Sucks Chart (compliments of Justin Sterling)
• Students share their feelings and thoughts about the chart
• Activity: Go to the future and once again see the outcome. Reconnect the students with a vision of
what is possible.
• Continue conversation about progress about the Community Service Project.
Prepare to wrap up the project, tie up loose ends, or prepare to execute the final stage.
• Homework: Prepare for final project presentation.

Class Twelve Overview: Third and Final Report - The Future
Each group will present their final project, identifying WHO, WHAT, WHY, WHERE & HOW regarding the significant aspects of what they imagine the future to hold and how it got that way. This is the grand finale—each group should do a special report/presentation, i.e. a group collage, a play, a poem, a song, a mobile, etc…)
Each group will need to identify:
1. What happened that accomplished their goal? Was it one big event, or was it gradual?
2. What was the “tipping point”?
3. Whom did it affect?
4. Where did their goal have the greatest impact?
5. When did this happen?
6. What role did you (the student) play in the successful accomplishment of this goal?
7. Describe your life as a _ year old, in the year 2015.
8. Describe the unfolding of your Community Service Project.
There should be some form of a party upon completion of these reports (i.e. a pizza party, candy, certificates,
something that honors and celebrates what they have done and how far they have come.) 11

Class One: Introduction
Prior to the class, the teacher should write down each of the eight
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) on slips of paper and put it in a bowl or a hat.
Materials needed for Class One:
• Copies of the Contract (page 28)
• Hand outs of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), see page 1.
• CD (10 minute time travel guided journey)

Class discussion regarding the United Nations and what it represents (i.e. the UN started in 1945 after WWII with 50 nations…now there are 192 member states…all nations except for Taiwan. It was conceived as an organization of “peace-loving” nations, who were combining to prevent future aggression and for other humanitarian purposes. Close cooperation among members was expected; the Security Council especially was expected to work in relative unanimity.)

Choose eight students to read the Millennium Development Goals and their affirmations.
The teacher will clarify any words that the students do not understand and create a discussion/Q&A around each goal. The Teacher will tell the class that it is a goal among the member states of the UN to enroll young people in the goals because their IMAGINATION AND PASSION is necessary for the fulfillment of the goals. Kids still have their ability to dream and believe that anything is possible, whereas the majority of adults have lost their ability to think outside the box. Their ability to DREAM of and believe in a better world is crucial to the accomplishment of the goals. It must be clear that the UN NEEDS THEM!
Pass out their contract (page 28) and have the students read it, sign and date it.
Each group leader will pull a goal out of the bowl /hat and present it to their group.
Each group leader will stand and declare to the class the goal that his or her group will be working on.
Applause should be encouraged to honor each brave soul that stands and speaks.

Teach the SLANT method of learning:
Learning the SLANT method will assist them in getting better grades, learning more from the class, and greater enjoyment.
S • Sit up front if you can, or sit with attention where ever you are.
L • Lean forward (act like you are interested.)
A • Ask questions during class.
N • Nod your head a lot (so it looks like you are learning something).
T • Talk to the teacher as you are leaving class (or Thank the teacher, and share with him/her what you learned that day.)

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Give the students an opportunity to practice SLANT while you read the following:
“We will have time to reach the Millennium Development Goals – worldwide and in
most, or even all, individual countries – but only if we break with business as usual.
We cannot win overnight. Success will require sustained action across the entire
decade between now and the deadline. It takes time to train the teachers, nurses and
engineers; to build the roads, schools and hospitals; to grow the small and large businesses able
to create the jobs and income needed. So we must start now. And we must more than double global
development assistance over the next few years. Nothing less will help to achieve the Goals.”
— Kofi A. Annan Former United Nations Secretary-General

The teacher introduces the trajectory of this project as an overview:
• Part One: The students will, through their imaginations, travel to the past in order to understand the
genesis of their assigned goal—as a group they will write reports on the who, what, why, where, and when of what they discover.
• Part Two: The students will travel to the present to identify what is currently being done to fulfill their goal. These reports will include the who, what, why, where, and when …and reflect what they have found in their group reports.
• Part Three: The students will travel to the future, to the year 2015 to identify how their goal became
accomplished. The students will identify what happened, who did their goal effect, and what part did they play in getting this goal fulfilled…all of which will be represented in their final reports.
The teacher should now “send the students through the time machine into the future.” This can be done by the students standing up and forming a circle around the room (holding hands if possible). The teacher leads the class in a “eyes closed imagination exercise” where the students envision their goal fulfilled, the way the world looks and feels, what they are doing in the future, what they look like, feel like, and what are they doing in this world. (If the teacher feels uncomfortable doing this, then he or she can opt to play the CD.) This process should take five to ten minutes.

Discuss the purpose of “beginning at the end”to create an anchor for the students to refer to when the going gets tough during this project. The goals addressed in the MDGs can be heartbreaking and disturbing for anyone to face, much less a young person. In order to create a context of inspiration for them, you will want to give them a glimpse at the light at the end of the tunnel so that they can carry that with them throughout this project. Although they may not see that “light” in this lifetime on a global scale, if they can continuously see it in their own minds, then they will create it, at least on some level, in their own lives…which in turn will have a ripple effect in the lives of the people they
interact with.

The students should then share about what they saw and connected with in this exercise.
Homework:
• Students will write a paragraph on what they saw, felt, or what thoughts were inspired from the
“time travel exercise.”
• Students will begin their research on the “past” aspect of their goal.
• Reminder: Their presentation on the past will be on week four.

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Class Two: Hero’s Journey
• Class participation regarding:
• What are they learning so far?
• What did they get out of the time machine experience from class one?
• What do they feel is the best part of this project?
• What is the most challenging aspect of this project?

Introduce The Hero’ s Journey
The Hero’s Journey, a book written by Joseph Campbell, discusses a model
of the predictable stages that a hero encounters on his/her noble quest.
There are many versions of this journey. It is most commonly referred to in
screenwriting courses as a template that outlines the phases of an inspirational
story (i.e. Star Wars). This will create an empowering context around the project
that dignifies the inevitable ups and downs, challenges and triumphs that the
students will face as they seek solutions for the MDGs. The following are the
stages the teacher will illustrate for the students:

1. Ordinary World – (Home/Limited Awareness)—This is the stage you were in prior to the beginning of this project.
2. Call to Adventure – (Increased Awareness)-This took place when the teacher introduced this project.
3. Refusal of the Call – (Reluctant Hero/Reluctance to Change)-For some, they might have felt reluctant to sign the contract, to go “into the time machine”, or to take on this project.
4. Meeting the Mentor – (Supernatural Aid/Overcoming Reluctance)-The teacher or parent is the mentor — a wise person to support them through the adventure.
5. Crossing the First Threshold – (Committing to Change)-This was the moment the students signed the
contract.

All of these first five phases take place by the end of the first day

6. Tests, Allies, Enemies – (Experimenting with First Change)—
a. The “Test” will be unique for each student (and the teacher)—it will be the first set of challenges, difficulties, and resistance.
b. Allies are the people in their group or the people in their lives who are supportive of them, people they can turn to when they have a rough day. The teacher should ask them to (insert “i”)identify allies in their personal lives (friends, siblings, cousins, parents, teachers, etc…)
c. Enemies would be the people that most challenge them. The lesson and the blessing with enemies is that they are “allies in disguise.” Enemies appear to be adversaries, but they challenge a person’s mettle and ultimately makes a person stronger, more resolute, compassionate, and powerful. There is no hero’s journey without the appearance of “enemies.”
7. Approach the Inmost Cave/Belly of the Whale – (Preparing for Big Change)-This will be an introspective moment for the students that will take place either inside or outside of class. Something will be going on in their life that perhaps will run parallel with the work they are doing in this project that will cause them to feel alone, abandoned, or left out. In this aloneness, if they allow it, they will be forced to identify a sense of themselves apart from the crowd. Often this is painful, but ultimately a blessing for they will learn to console themselves and recognize the voice of their own inner wisdom. 8. Ordeal – (Attempting Big Change)- This phase may come in the form of the students researching these issues and finding them to be overwhelming. Or this phase may be about the students facing their own resignation or their greatest fear (i.e. public speaking, looking stupid, not being valued,
poverty, peer pressure, etc…) Or the ordeal may be about the challenges involved with taking on the community service project.
8. Ordeal – (Attempting Big Change)-This phase may come in the form of the students researching these issues and finding them to be overwhelming. Or this phase may be about the students facing their own resignation or their greatest fear (i.e. public speaking, looking stupid, not being valued, poverty, peer pressure, etc…) Or the ordeal may be about the challenges involved with taking on the community service project.

The majority of the above three phases take place during week 1-8 14

9. Reward – (Gift/Consequence of the Attempt)-There will inevitably be a sense of pride, self-esteem, and optimism that will occur within each student; a sense of psychological well-being for the courage it takes to stretch, grow, and confront difficult issues head-on. The student’s final report on “The Solution” will be an expression of their reward of greater awareness and contribution to mankind.
10. Road Back – (Flight/Re-dedication to Change)-This will need to be a conversation spanning Classes ten through twelve. This phase is when the student begins to get a sense of their participation, passion, involvement in the
Dream Project beyond this class. The students should begin to dialogue about
what they will do once this program is complete.
11. Resurrection – (Final Attempt at Big Change)-This is when the students begin
to have a change in character, a paradigm shift about themselves and they begin
to relate to themselves as a hero on a hero’s journey. This may be disorienting,
there may be rebellion, there may be a last ditch effort to cling to their old identity.
12. Return with the Elixir – (Final Mastery of the Problem)-This may be on Class Twelve when the
students present their reports, or this may take place once the student integrates what they have learned and see the fruit of their labor. This is the stage when they truly embody the most important aspects of this project.
It is recommended to have some sort of party or celebration that the parents can attend that honors the
students for what they have learned and what they will do beyond this project. Doing this creates a sense of pride and inspiration that can literally be taken home with them.

Discussion: What is the purpose of seeing the full circle of the Hero’s Journey?
• Most people set out on a noble task feeling very optimistic about their journey. If they don’t realize that the inevitable challenges along the way then they run the risk of getting discouraged and disheartened. But if you understand the Hero’s journey and the points along the way, then you will be prepared, focused on your goal, and might even enjoy the journey.

Activity: Assign Hero’s Journey Stations around the classroom, with one student to represent each stage. Have the students walk through each station.
Assignment: Write an essay about how you imagine your hero’s journey will be during this project.

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Class Three: Affirmations
• Check in on how their research for their goal is going.
• Discuss what they are learning and how they are changing.
Affirmations
Discuss the importance of memorizing the affirmation version of their goal. Because the goals that these students are working on are difficult for most adults to face, in order not to have them get depressed and resigned based on what they will find (or have already found) in their research, it is important to develop a relationship with each goal as if it was already an accomplished fact.

United Nations Millennium Development Goals
By 2015, it is possible to…
1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
2. Achieve universal primary education
3. Promote gender equality and empower women
4. Reduce child mortality 5. Improve maternal health
6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
7. Ensure environmental sustainability
8. Develop a global partnership for development

United Nations Millennium Development Goals Affirmations
(Created by Kelly Sullivan Walden for The Dream Project)
By 2015, it is a reality that…
1. There is food, clean water, and shelter for all people
2. Education through primary school is universally available
3. Everyone on the planet is empowered to be their best selves and to live their best lives
4. Children are born into safe, clean, nurturing environments
5. There is support and care for women in childbirth
6. There is healthcare available for all people
7. There is environmental sustainability for all people of this world
8. The global leaders as well as the people of this world work in partnership for the betterment of all

Activity:
• Create posters for the classroom that express the Affirmation version of each group’s goal.
Homework:
• Write about your feelings regarding the Affirmation version of your goal.
• Do you see the importance?
• How does it make you feel?
• What does it make you think about?

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Class Four: First Report - The Past
The entire class period will be devoted to the presentation of each group’s report on the past aspect of their goal. The group leader will assign each group member a specific aspect of the report to research. For example, one member will be assigned the task of identifying WHO (what people, age, demographics) his or her goal affects. Prior to the presentation of the report, the group leader should combine each member’s contribution and put it into a cohesive, singular report. Each member of the group will be required to present to the class their findings and their personal feelings/thoughts about what they found.

Part 1: The Past - What was it like?
This is where the students will work together with their group and write /present a report on your assigned problem that your goal addresses. They will need to identify:
1. What is the issue that their goal addresses?
2. Who does the problem affect?
3. When did the problem start?
4. Why did the problem start?
5. Where does the problem exist?
6. What are their personal thoughts and feelings about this issue?

Q&A with the class: The group presenting will act as experts in the field of their goal while enlightening the rest of the class about the genesis of the issue on which they are working.

Class Five: They Is Me!
• Discuss what they learned from presenting their reports.
• What did you learn?
• What was your favorite part about presenting your report?
• What was the most challenging part?

They Is Me!:
“Young people ask me, ‘How do I get people to take me seriously?’ My answer is simple,
“Take YOURSELF seriously.”

“Everyone is looking for a hero, people need someone to look up to. I could never find anyone who could fill my needs. A lonely place to be, until I learned to depend on me.” — Shamina Degonzaga, Special Advisor to the UN

Greatest Love Of All - lyrics, performed by Whitney Houston

Discuss the issue of blaming the government, parents, the media, anybody for the state of the world. Lead a class discussion about identifying that “They is me.” If we are to make a difference we must stop blaming and take 100% responsibility for our lives and the world we live in. Have the kids point at themselves and say, “They is me.”

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Activity: Human Knot
In order to demonstrate the “They Is Me” conversation, have the students divide
into groups of 4 or more. The groups must be an even numbered amount of
people (even if that means that the teacher joins one of the groups.) The students
take the hands of two different people in the circle (they cannot grab two hands
from the same person.) Once everyone has two hands that are connected to two
different people, they are in a human knot. Now they must untangle the knot
without disconnecting hands. Eventually, if they do the exercise correctly they will
mysteriously end up in a circle. In order to achieve this, they must act in a cohesive,
symbiotic way without splitting off from one another.

Think Globally, Act Locally Discussion:
• Discuss the broader perspective that you have when you look at global issues.
• How does the spirit of activism relate to what we do in our own back yard?
• If you could make a difference in your community, in your school, in your neighborhood, or in your family, what would it be?
• What will you do to make a difference on a local/familial/community level?
• Instruct the students to continue this discussion in their small groups.
• Tell the group leader to make a list of the ideas their group comes up with.
• Each group should ultimately come up with one goal they can help each other achieve (i.e. painting over graffiti, picking up litter, a carwash to raise money for someone who needs it, being kind to their sister…)

Reading: The Life of Our Dreams:

Most people don’t fully realize that we all have within us the ability to co-create our lives. So many of us are taught to accept what we are given and not even to dream of anything more. But our hopes and dreams are the universe whispering to us, planting an idea of what’s possible while directing us toward the best use of our gifts. Life truly wants to give us our hearts’ desires, but we need to be clear about what they are and ask for them. To ask for something does not mean to beg or plead from a place of lack or unworthiness. It’s like placing an order — we don’t need to beg the salesperson for what we want or prove to them that we deserve to have it. It is their job to give us what we ask for; we only have to tell them what we want. Once we have a clear vision of what we desire, we simply step into the silent realm where all possibilities exist and let our desires be known. Whatever methods we use to become still, it is important that we find the quiet space between our thoughts. From that still and quiet place, we can announce our intentions to the pure energy of creation. By imagining all the details from every angle, including scent, color, and how it would feel to have it, we design our dreams to our specifications. Similar to dropping a pebble into a pond, the ripples created by our thoughts travel quickly from this place of stillness, echoing out into the world to align and orchestrate all the necessary details to bring our desires into manifestation. Before leaving this wonderful space to come back to the world, release any attachment to the outcome and express gratitude. By doing this daily, we focus our thoughts and our energy while regularly mingling with the essence that makes it possible to build the life of our dreams.

Daily Om

Visualization: Tell the students to close their eyes, and picture the outcome of their goal as if it was already done. Picture a personal goal, and imagine it already done. Ask them to ask themselves,
• What is that I must become in order to be a magnet for this goal to be fulfilled?
• What must I do?
• What must I release?
• What qualities must I embrace (i.e. love, peace, harmony, kindness, courage, etc…)?
Homework: Answer the questions listed above with regards to your MDG as well as your personal goal.

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Class Six: Leadership Training
Materials needed: Nametags for each student and markers.
Check in:
• Class participation regarding:
• What are the highs?
• What are the lows?
• What they are learning?
• What are they discovering about themselves?
“Leadership can be thought of as a capacity to define oneself to others in a way
that clarifies and expands a vision of the future.” — Edwin H. Friedman
Examples of leaders:
• Martin Luther King, Jr.
• Gandhi
• Mother Teresa
• Oprah Winfrey
• Mother
• Father
• (Ask the class to participate in naming more)

Qualities of a leader:
• Vision
• Responsibility
• Passion
• Purpose
• Compassion
• Inspirational
• Teamwork
• (and the class to name more)

Assignment:
• List the five leaders you most admire.
• Write five adjectives that describe each leader.
• Narrow your list of leadership qualities down to your top five. What are the five qualities that you think are the most important for a leader to embody?
• Allow for a few minutes for the students to share the 5 qualities that describe leadership to them and why.

Activity: The students will now create nametags. Instead of their name written on the tag, they will write the ONE quality that most represents leadership to them.
• Once they put on this name tag, the students will stand up, act as if they fully embody this quality as they mull around, and introduce themselves to one another (at least 10 people) as their leadership quality.
• Suggest that they begin to call each other by these new “names” to reinforce these qualities and to begin to see one another as the embodiment of this particular aspect of leadership.

Homework: Write a paper discussing the following questions:
• What your life would be like if you fully embodied your leadership quality?
• What would be different?
• What might change?
• How would your goal be affected if you fully embodied your leadership quality? 19

Class Seven: Be-Do-Have
Check in:
• Class participation regarding:
• What are the highs?
• What are the lows?
• What they are learning?
• What are they discovering about themselves?

Reading:
“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you NOT to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within you. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone. As you let your own light shine, you unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As you are liberated from your fear, your presence automatically liberates others.” By Marianne Williamson

• Allow a few moments for class discussion about the reading

Be-Do-Have
Write on the board: BeDoHave
Discussion: Most people relate to goals as DoHaveBe (write on board)
• People think that if they DO what they have to do, they will HAVE the result they want, and then they will BE happy.
• This is actually backwards.
• Because you are all time travelers, you understand that it is the other way around. You must first do as Gandhi says, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” You must embody the qualities that you think the outcome of your goal will give you.
• Imagine something you want in your life.
• Imagine your behavior upon achieving this goal.
• Now, what action steps are you inspired to take?
If you continue to BE the change you wish to see, and take the inspired action it inspires, within no time you will HAVE your goal. But, you are not waiting to feel peaceful, content, and joyful… you already are.

Win/Win:
• Who do you fight/argue/disagree with in your life?
• How could learning creative problem solving make you a more effective role-model?

Activity:
Dividing the Orange: The orange represents something that they are fighting over with an “opponent.”
Discuss ways in which they can divide up the orange to create a win/win situation.
Homework: Write a paper on the following:
• What is the value of creating a win/win situation?
• In what area in your life will you create a win/win situation?

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Class Eight: Second Report-The Present
The entire class period will be devoted to the presentation of each group’s report on the present aspect of their goal.
The group leader should assign each group member a specific aspect of the report to research. For example, one member will be assigned the task of identifying WHO (what people, organizations, celebrities, ordinary people, students) are working toward solutions on his or her goal. Prior to the presentation of the report, the group leader should combine each member’s contribution and put it into a cohesive, singular report. Each member of the group will be required to present to the class their findings and their personal feelings/thoughts about what they found.

Part 2: The present-What is being done now?
This is where the students will work together with their group and write /present a report based on what is being done now to fix the problem. This is the beginning of the solution part of this project. They will need to identify:
4. Who are the organizations or individuals are that currently working toward the fulfillment of their goal? They should pick one that they think is doing the best job.
5. What is the group doing toward the solution?
6. Where are they doing their work?
7. What are their personal thoughts and feelings about this group and the work they are doing?

Q&A with the class: The group presenting will act as experts in the field of their goal while enlightening the rest of the class about the current individuals and organizations that are making a positive impact on the issue they are working toward.

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Class Nine: Bringing It Down to Earth
Check in:
• Class participation regarding:
• What are the highs?
• What are the lows?
• What they are learning?
• What are they discovering about themselves?

Preparation: Hand out a copy of this poem to each student. Read this to the class
and allow a class discussion to follow:

The Invitation - by Oriah Mountain Dreamer

It doesn’t interest me what you do for a living.
I want to know what you ache for,
and if you dare to dream of meeting your heart’s longing.
It doesn’t interest me how old you are.
I want to know if you will risk looking like a fool for love,
for your dream, for the adventure of being alive.
It doesn’t interest me what planets are squaring your moon.
I want to know if you have touched the center of your own sorrow,
if you have been opened by life’s betrayals
or have become shriveled and closed from fear of further pain!
I want to know if you can sit with pain, mine or your own,
without moving to hide it or fade it, or fix it.
I want to know if you can be with joy, mine or your own,
if you can dance with wildness
and let the ecstasy fill you to the tips of your fingers and toes
without cautioning to be careful, to be realistic,
or to remember the limitations of being human.
It doesn’t interest me if the story you are telling me is true.
I want to know if you can disappoint another to be true to yourself;
if you can bear the accusation of betrayal and not betray your own soul;
if you can be faithless and therefore trustworthy.
I want to know if you can see beauty even when it’s not pretty,
every day, and if you can source your own life from its presence.
I want to know if you can live with failure,
yours and mine, and still stand on the edge of the lake
and shout to the silver of the full moon, “Yes!”
It doesn’t interest me to know where you live or how much money you have.
I want to know if you can get up, after the night of grief and despair,
weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done to feed the children.
It doesn’t interest me who you know or how you came to be here.
I want to know if you will stand in the center of the fire with me and not shrink back.
It doesn’t interest me where or what or with whom you have studied.
I want to know what sustains you, from the inside, when all else falls away.
I want to know if you can be alone with yourself
and if you truly like the company you keep in the empty moments.”

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Activity:
Underline each part of this poem that you agree with or think is important.
Discussion:
• Have the students share about the part of the poem that spoke most
profoundly to them and why.
• What will you do when this project is complete?
• What can you do to continue the momentum of this program after this phase
of it is complete?

Community Service Project:
• Each group will discuss ideas about a service project that they would like to do
bring the MDGs to their community.
• Let each group leader share with the class what their group discussed, while the teacher
(or an assigned student writes the key points on the board in the front of the classroom.)
• Begin to identify the light bulb alert, the project or idea that the whole class gets excited about-you are fishing for one thing that the class can do together (i.e. a fundraiser for a battered women’s shelter, a carwash for a clean environment, a bake sale dedicated to feeling the hungry, etc…)
• Assign each group a different role to accomplish this goal-the action plan that it takes to carry this into action.
• Homework: This will be an extension of their group’s assignment (i.e. enrolling their friends to bring baked goods, or to help with the carwash, or to paint over graffiti, etc…)
Write a page about how you will continue your participation, passion and involvement in the Dream Project beyond this class.

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Class Ten: The Law of Importance (Woody Woodward)
Check in:
• Class participation regarding:
• What are the highs?
• What are the lows?
• What they are learning?
• What are they discovering about themselves?

“Pretend that every single person you meet has a sign around his or her neck that says, ‘Make me feel important.’ Not only will you succeed in sales, you will succeed in life.” — Mary Kay Ash

“A human being is a part of a whole, called by us _universe_, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” — Albert Einstein

Class Assignment: Identify the I’s
• Ask the class to write down the five times in their life they felt the most important? (In other words, their happiest/peak moments.)
• Next, ask them to write about why each time made them feel important? (I.e. I felt like I made a difference, I felt smart, I felt valued, lucky, powerful, capable, etc…)
• The students should end up with 5 words that represent their version of importance.
These words become their I’s. (Reference: http://www.lawofimportance.com/)
Participation: Allow all the students to share their 1 (either in their small groups or at class level)

Discussion: Anatomy of an “I”
• Principle 1: If two or more I’s are being met simultaneously, you will have
a positive peak in attitude, more so than just a normal day.
• Principle 2: If two or more I’s are being offended simultaneously, you will have
a negative drop in attitude, more so than just a normal day.
• Principle 3: Subconsciously or consciously you will do anything within your belief
system to defend or support your I’s.
• Principle 4: I’s are created by Mind Shifts. Mind Shifts are created by drama or
trauma. (i.e. a startling circumstance, either extremely pleasant or unpleasant.)

Why is this an important thing for an effective leader to know?
Consider that in order to affect change, you have to consider the I’s of the people you are working with.
• Ask for a student to share about a fight or a battle of wills they have recently had.
• Once the student has shared the circumstances around their “breakdown,” ask them to share their I’s.
• Ask them to imagine what the I’s are of the person they had the breakdown with.
• Identify where there was a clash of I’s.
• Identify that with an understanding of the Law of Importance they could have negotiated their way through this confrontation more effectively. Remember that a person will do anything within their belief system to defend or support their I’s.

Activity: Pair up with someone you don’t know very well. They will be your partner for
this “Trust Exercise.” Pair up in a line outside and remain as quiet as possible.
Tie a bandana around the eyes of your partner, and lead them on a walk, guiding them and assisting them as you walk. Then switch so that the person who was the leader is now being led.
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Discussion: How did it feel to lead and truly care for someone’s well-being, to treat someone like they were important? Did you feel important and cared for when you were blindfolded? This is an opportunity to trust the good intentions of someone you don’t know very well-let this represent the world-and knowing what it means to means to be vulnerable, as well as what it means to take someone else’s well-being and sense of importance in your hands.

Continue conversation about progress re: Community Service Project
• How is it going?
• Are you meeting your short-term goals?
• What are your long-term goals?

Homework:

Assignment#1:
• Write about a person you have or have had a conflict with.
• Identify your I’s and identify their I’s.
• Write about how you will interact with this person more effectively in the future.

Assignment#2:
• Write about your most important I, and why it means so much to you.
• How can you meet that I regardless of your circumstances?

Class Eleven: On What Level Do You Want To Make A Difference?
Check in:
• Class participation regarding:
• How is their community service project going?
• What were the results?
• What were the highs?
• What were the lows?
•What did they learn?
• What did they discover about themselves?

Reading:
One day a man was walking along a beach when he noticed a figure in the distance. As he got closer, he realized the figure was that of a boy picking something up and throwing it into the ocean. Approaching the boy, he asked, “What are you doing?” The youth replied, “Throwing a starfish into the ocean. The sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don’t throw them back, they will die.” “Son,” the man said, “don’t you realize there are miles and miles of beach and hundreds of starfish? You can’t possibly make a difference!” After listening politely, the boy bent down, picked up another starfish, and threw it into the surf. Then, smiling at the man, he said, “I made a difference for that one.” — Author Unknown

“The most important characteristic that enables people to stay the course through great difficulties is that they have a powerful purpose. Whenever you want to make any change in your life, the purpose behind your goal is more important than the goal itself. It will keep you going when obstacles raise their ugly heads. Knowing your “why” intensifies your desire and commitment; if you can create enough reasons why you want to make a change, there’s nothing that can stop you.” — Cynthia Cursey
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Life Sucks Chart (compliments of Justin Sterling)
Drawn a funnel in ascending order: The individual-only concerned about themselves. Anything can hurt them, destroy them, knock them off balance, because their whole world is very, very small.
One-on-one relationship/partnership: A bit stronger, wiser, two can do more than one, but still the world view is narrow, and almost anything can rock this ship.
Family: With a family, you are as powerful and as spacious as there are members in your family-the more people you love and care about equals more personal power, space, influence. The bigger your circle of influence is, the less little things weigh you down…because you are too big to sweat the small stuff.
Community: When you embrace the needs of your community as your own, you have just exponentially expanded your sense of self, value, worth, and self-esteem. When something goes wrong, you have a greater base of community to stabilize you—your worth and your life is service oriented and thus powerful.
Universal: When you take on the world as yours, when you relate to yourself as a global citizen, one whose purpose and focus is on a global level then you certainly don’t have time to sweat the small stuff. Your personal power is greater, your vision is enormous (and life definitely doesn’t suck!)
The highest level is universal: When you consider the well-being of the planet, the future of all sentient beings everywhere, throughout all space and time, you are elevated to ultimate consciousness. You relate to yourself as the infinite being you truly are, and you relate to others from that place as well. From this place NOTHING CAN EVER ROCK YOUR WORLD! Because you are connected to everything!
Class Discussion: Invite the students to share their feelings and thoughts.
Continue conversation about progress re: Community Service Project
• Prepare to wrap up the project, tie up lose ends, or prepare to execute the final stage.
• Homework: Prepare for final project presentation.
Go to the future and once again see the outcome. Get filled up with the vision of what is possible.

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Class Twelve: Third Report - The Future
Prior to the presentation of the report, there should be a brief “Time Machine”
experience (See Class One for more details) where the students close their eyes, the lights flicker on and off, and the teacher tells them that they have gone from the current year to 2015. Their goals are fulfilled, and they played a role in it being that way. Spend a moment in silence while they observe the world and themselves in 2015. Bring them back to the present, where they will now deliver their reports on what they have seen, what they imagine the future to hold and how they believe it got to be that way.

The entire class period will be devoted to the presentation of each group’s report on the future. This is the grand finale—each group should do a special report/presentation, i.e. a group collage, a play, a poem, a song, a mobile, etc…) This report is based on what they see in the future regarding how their goal was accomplished. In order for each student to get an opportunity to share, the group leader should assign each group member a specific aspect of the report to research and deliver the oral presentation.
For example, if there are four members in a group then the report can be divided as follows:
• WHO (What people does the future affect? What people are most affected by the future changes you see? Who made these changes? What did you do?)
• WHAT (What happened to fulfill this goal? What does the world look like with regards to your goal?)
• WHY (Why did these changes take place? What is the mindset of the people that were influential in making these changes—“What was their why?”)
• HOW (How did these changes take place? What was done and how did these changes get implemented?)
• WHERE (Where did this goal make the most significant impact? Is there a relationship between this geographical location and other places around the world?)

If there are more students in the groups, then they can answer the following additional questions:
• What happened that accomplished their goal?
• Was it one big event, or was it gradual?
• What was the “tipping point”?
• Whom did it affect?
• Where did their goal have the greatest impact?
• When did this happen?
• What role did you (the student) play in the successful accomplishment of this goal?
• Describe your life as a _ year old, in the year 2015.
• Describe the unfolding of your Community Service Project

Prior to the presentation of the report, the group leader should combine each member’s contribution and put it into a cohesive, singular report. Each member of the group will be required to present to the class their findings and their personal feelings/thoughts about what they found.
There should be some form of a party upon completion of these reports (i.e. a pizza party, candy, certificates, tee-shirts, etc…something that honors and celebrates what they have done and how far they have come.)

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The Dream Project Contract
Thank you for your willingness to participate in The Dream Project, a scholastic endeavor that involves the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, and your imagination. Your participation is extremely important to the success of this project and most certainly to the fulfillment of the Millennium Development Goals themselves. In order to ensure that you are clear about what you are accepting, the following is a contract that outlines what will be expected of you throughout the duration of this project.

1. I (…………..) consent to participate in The Dream Project, a three-month scholastic
endeavor that could change the course of history.
2. I (…………..) promise to see/imagine/envision/relate to these goals as if they are
already fulfilled.
3. I (…………..) promise that I will participate in this project to the fullest extent that I am
capable.
4. I (…………..) realize that the ideas, insights, and solutions I (we) create could have a
profound impact on world peace.
5. I (…………..) promise that during the Dream Project, I will take excellent care of
myself (i.e. eating well, getting adequate rest, doing my homework for other classes, practicing honesty, kindness,
compassion, and support toward my family, and friendsespecially those who challenge me the most.)
6. I (…………..) will be supportive of the people in my group, and of all the participants
in the Dream Project.
7. I (…………..) promise to remain positive, optimistic, and enthusiastic throughout the
entire process of this project.
(…………..) _
(Signature) (Date)

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Favorite Dream Project Quotes
“Everybody can be great… because anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has”
Margaret Mead

“Be the peace you seek.” — Mahatma K. Gandhi
“Everyone can be great because everyone can serve.” — Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Think globally, act locally.”

“The measure of our humanity is in how we treat the most vulnerable.” — Jan Eliason

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For information about how you can participate in the
Dream Project, purchase materials, or learn to become a
Dream Project Facilitator, please contact:

Kelly Sullivan Walden gro.NUtcejorPmaerD|yllek#gro.NUtcejorPmaerD|yllek
(323) 893-3028
The Dream Project http://www.DreamProjectUN.com

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